Affenpinscher

Loyal, curious, and famously amusing, this almost-human toy dog is fearless out of all proportion to his size.

Affenpinscher
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Overall Status

Height 9 to 11.5 inches
Temperament Confident, Famously Funny, Fearless
Weight 7 to 10 pounds
Life Expectancy 12 to 15 years
Coat Color Black, Black & Tan, Red, Gray
Barking Level When Necessery

Quick Factors

Playfulness
Dog Friendly
Exercise Need
Grooming Needs
Strangers Friendly
Family Affectionate
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Daily Care

Grooming Tips Exercise Tips Feeding Tips Health Tips Trainability

The Affenpinscher’s medium-length, wiry coat should be groomed twice a week, first with a brush and then with a metal comb. Any mats should be pulled apart with the fingers. The hair on the head is usually brushed forward over the face, and then an inverted V-shape is cut to expose the eyes. Similarly, the hair on the bridge of the nose is trimmed into a fan shape to keep the eyes clear. The Affen’s coat does not grow quickly, so a trimming a pet Affen every few months should suffice.

Check the ears on a weekly basis for signs of infection, irritation, or wax build up. Cleanse regularly with a veterinarian-approved cleanser and cotton ball. Brush the teeth at least once per week to prevent tartar buildup and fight gum disease. Additionally, nails should be trimmed once per month if the dog does not wear down the toenails naturally.

One of the attractions of the toy breeds is that theirsmall sizemakes them ideal apartment dogs. While Affenpinschers can be perfectly happy living in close quarters, the breed is classified as “moderately active,” and as such, they do needexercise. Indoor play, both with his owner and just between himself and a toy, can be enough to make up a large chunk of an Affen’s exercise regimen.

With this said, Barbet puppies should not be given too much exercise because their joints and bones are still growing and too much pressure on them could result in causing a dog a few problems later on in their lives. They should not be allowed to jump up or off furniture nor should they be allowed to run up and down the stairs because this puts too much pressure on their still growing joints and limbs.

If you get a Samoyed puppy from a breeder, they would give you a feeding schedule and it's important to stick to the same routine, feeding the same puppy food to avoid any tummy upsets. You can change a puppy's diet, but this needs to be done very gradually always making sure they don't develop any digestive upsets and if they do, it's best to put them back on their original diet and to discuss things with the vet before attempting to change it again.

Older dogs are not known to be fussy or finicky eaters, but this does not mean you can feed them a lower quality diet. It's best to feed a mature dog twice a day, once in the morning and then again in the evening, making sure it's good quality food that meets all their nutritional requirements. It's also important that dogs be given the right amount of exercise so they burn off any excess calories or they might gain too much weight which can lead to all sorts of health issues. Obesity can shorten a dog's life by several years so it's important to keep an eye on their waistline from the word go.

Learn about which human foods are safe for dogs, and which are not. Check with your vet if you have any concerns about your dog’s weight or diet. Clean, fresh water should be available at all times. Like many large breeds, Saint Bernard can experience bloat, a life-threatening condition where the stomach distends and twists. The causes of bloat aren’t fully understood, but experts agree that multiple, small meals per day and preventing vigorous exercise around mealtimes may help reduce the chances of it happening.

All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems, just as all people have the potential to inherit a particular disease. Run, don’t walk, from any breeder who does not offer a health guarantee on puppies, who tells you that the breed is 100 percent healthy and has no known problems, or who tells you that her puppies are isolated from the main part of the household for health reasons. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur in her lines.

Affenpinschers are generally healthy dogs, and responsible breeders will screen their stock for health conditions such as luxating patella, heart anomalies, vision problems, andhip dysplasia. Like other shorter-faced breeds, Affens can experience breathing problems duringhot weatherif they are permitted to overheat and then have difficulty panting in order to lower their body temperature, as dogs don’t sweat to keep cool.

Affenpinschers are courageous, bold, and often feisty. Basicobediencetraining is recommended. The breed has an undeserved reputation as being difficult to train because Affenpinschers are independent minded and can be stubborn. The key is that they are very intelligent and generally eager to please the humans they have bonded with. Keep in mind that they are easily bored and tend to lose interest during long training sessions. Shorter, more frequent sessions with a trainer who has experience working withtoy breedsare usually quite successful.

Puppies should be properly socialized to develop the amiable, outgoing personality that is characteristic of the breed. They’re successful in performance and companion events such as earthdog, barn hunt, obedience, and agility.

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History

The breed is German in origin and dates back to the seventeenth century. The name is derived from the German Affe (ape, monkey). The breed predates and is ancestral to the Griffon Bruxellois (Brussels Griffon) andMiniature Schnauzer. Dogs of the Affenpinscher type have been known since about 1600, but these were somewhat larger, about 12 to 13 inches, and came in colors of gray, fawn, black and tan and also red. White feet and chest were also common.

The breed was created to be a ratter, working to remove rodents from kitchens, granaries, and stables. Banana Joe V Tani Kazari (AKA Joe), a five-year-old Affenpinscher, was named Best in Show at the 2013 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show in New York City. This win is notable since it is the first time this breed has won Best in Show at Westminster.

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Picture & Video

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